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October 2014

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From:
B Bergenstock <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
B Bergenstock <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:55:33 -0400
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The research often comes in the form of a skit. I have seen projects from
World research winners that looked like board presentation, with the kids
in a line each speaking about their idea and a backboard for more info.
 The most important thing, no matter what format they use, is that they be
able to get out of all the information they wish to share in the time
allotment- 5 minutes.  I coached a team one year and all the info and
solution was at the end of the presentation, but because the kids went
long, or very lowly in one case, they spent all their time on presenting
the issue and never got to their solution. It wasn't a great plan and while
I had stressed to them about time and we had done the skit many times, I
now just tell the teams, "Nope, you can't back load your solution."

The function of the presentation board can be varied. It often serves to
make sure kids hit important markers that they carefully thought about in
group, but might forget in their nervousness during or after the
presentation. It also serves to tell teams in the pit area what your team
did for their presentation; Sharing ideas and allowing other adults to ask
question and celebrate their work.  I have seen several very successful
boards that have 1 flap dedicated to each of the area of judging; robot
design, presentation and core values. The teams will bring the board into
each judging room and use it as a prop, sometimes talking about it,
sometimes not- but always having it there as a backup :)
To me, the main purpose of the boards is to help the kids and act as review
of the process when they need it.  Using that as your guide will help
decide what goes on the board.
Good luck,
Brandy

On Mon, Oct 20, 2014 at 9:23 AM, Faith Mcgarrity <[log in to unmask]>
wrote:

> Looking for some tips on the Project and presentation. Is the skit
> supposed to be informational designed to hit all the elements in the
> rubric? Like a school presentation. Or should it be a story type of skit
> showing our solution?  If the latter will the team have opportunity to fill
> in the rest of the elements ( ie the sharing or implementation) after the
> skit?
>
> And what is the function of the presentation board?  To document the
> solution?  Or can it incorporate core values experiences and/or robot game
> progress?
>
> Thanks for your thoughts!
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
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