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We were in the same boat.  Our experts (including a former NASA
administrator) all liked our solution and said that it was clear that the
kids had really researched and understood the problem.  The judges rated
everything... quality of research, knowledge of the problem, and innovation
in the "developing" column.  The comments on the rubric clearly indicate
that the judges didn't understand the problem, nor did they understand the
solution that the team presented.  I have judged for the project in prior
years... I get it.  It's not easy.  That said, it's hard to explain the
disconnect to the kids.

-Frank



On Sat, Nov 17, 2018 at 8:07 PM Sreeni Konanki <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>
> My point here is not to blame judges, but asking the judges to be
> judicious about their skills and what they can judge and what they cannot
> when given a judging event which they don't have a clue about. Yes we did
> get a rookie judge team which had no clue about. Misjudging can disappoint
> any team that gets affected.
> Request to the organizers while assigning events (Project/robot/core
> values) to the judge volunteers, to atleast put one experienced with a
> rookie and not both rookies. I could see our judges during the event and
> their face clearly tells they had no clue. Kids presented their project and
> solution to experts and they all got appreciation.
> While I understand judges are volunteers and humans, sometimes having
> inexperienced judges and no knowledge on the topic can be really hurting.
> Its not sour grapes (we have been to states and won awards earlier, so
> winning an award is not a point at all). Point here is the feedback given
> shows that the judges were not paying attention to the presentation at all
> (which I noticed during their questions, as they were asking questions that
> were already clearly explained and also given a handout the bio's of the
> experts they showed their solution).
>
> It was clearly visible from the feedback that our team were not judged
> correctly (even judging correctly may not have changed the outcome) and
> kids were completely let down after they saw the feedback from the judges
> for the project. They have done a lot of research and the subject on the
> space radiation is huge, One comment was that the solution was not
> original, explains it all they didn't have a clue what the solution was.
>
> So long mail is not to change the outcome of the event. But, an effort for
> other teams not to get affected by misjudging and inexperience. This is not
> to hurt feelings of volunteers who are doing excellent job, but suggestion
> to make things better.
>
> Thanks,
> Sreeni Konanki
> Team Geminids - 23731
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